Meet the young researchers who want to tackle fishing litter

Rebecca and Christie from North Berwick Youth Project talk about their involvement with On Our Wave Length, a youth-led research project examining the environmental impacts on coastal communities in Scotland.

We are the North Berwick On Our Wavelength Eco group. We have been meeting regularly since October last year to talk about problems in the environment locally and around the world. We discussed what we think it is a problem for the environment and we came up with the problems of fishing litter, litter from land and endangered sea animals dying.

Before lockdown, we got to go to our local Seabird Centre to learn from them about the local environment. They told us about the different plastics and the nurdles that wash up on beach. They even gave us a big jar of plastic nurdles to take home!

 

 

We have been thinking of lots of ideas of how to talk to people about what we have been learning. One of our group members, Rebecca has written a rap about her thoughts on the environment.

 

“Hi my name is Rebecca!

I am from the Environment Group in NB

And I am here to tell what it is

It’s about plastic which is in your beaches and seas

What you can do about it?

Like helping by recycling more

And think about what you are putting away!"

 

 

Recently, Rebecca went on holiday to Dubai and saw lots litter on the beaches where the boats were. Rebeca did a small beach survey and found:

Item

How many found

Plastic bottles

10

Paper

5

Ice cream tubs

1

Battery

1

Plastic lids

2

Wood

7

Cans

5

Plastic bags

7

Cardboard

Lots!

Cigarette butts

3

Juice cartons

2

Polystyrene

9

Black oil

1

Plastic straws

1

 

We have an idea! Fishermen should start using cameras to see what is under the water - they should have an iPad in the wheelhouse, so the fishermen can see what plastic and waste is under the sea. This means the fishermen can catch the right fish and not endangered ones. Can fishermen use smaller nets so they don’t catch endangered animals.

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